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A Problem of Politics and History, Not Religion: Understanding Sectarianism in the Modern Arab World

A Problem of Politics and History, Not Religion: Understanding Sectarianism in the Modern Arab World
1 Devonshire Place, Munk School of Global Affairs, Room 208N
Time: Mar 6th, 5:00 pm End: Mar 6th, 6:30 pm
Interest Categories: United States Studies, Religion, Study of (FAS), Political Science, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), History (FAS), Historical Studies (UTM), Historical and Cultural Studies (UTSC), 2000-, 1950-2000, 1900-1950, 1800-1900
Talk by Ussama Makdisi, Rice University

The Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations is pleased to present:

Ussama Makdisi, History, Rice University

A Problem of Politics and History, Not Religion: Understanding Sectarianism in the Modern Arab World

ABSTRACT:  It is widely believed that a single, peculiar problem of sectarianism is at the root of the problems of the Middle East as a region. In reality, there is no such single problem, but rather particular situations and contexts that make various sectarian problems imminent. Ussama Makdisi, historian at Rice University and a leading authority on sectarianism in the history of the Arab world, explores the complexities of sectarianism in the region.

Ussama Makdisi is Professor of History and Arab-American Educational Foundation Chair of Arab Studies at Rice University. He is the author of Faith Misplaced: the Broken Promise of U.S.-Arab Relations, 1820-2001; Artillery of Heaven: American Missionaries and the Failed Conversion of the Middle East; The Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Lebanon; and is co-editor of Memory and Violence in the Middle East and North Africa.  Among his major articles are “Anti-Americanism in the Arab World: An Interpretation of Brief History,” “Ottoman Orientalism” and “Reclaiming the Land of the Bible: Missionaries, Secularism, and Evangelical Modernity.” Professor Makdisi is currently working on a manuscript on the origins of sectarianism in the modern Middle East.

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  To register, please click HERE.

For further information, please contact the organizer, Professor Jens Hanssen, or the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations at (416) 978-3306.


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