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Islam is a Foreign Country: Global Muslim Pedagogical Networks and the Crisis of Authority

Islam is a Foreign Country: Global Muslim Pedagogical Networks and the Crisis of Authority
170 St. George St., Room 100a
Time: Mar 24th, 1:00 pm End: Mar 24th, 3:00 pm
Interest Categories: United States Studies, Religion, Study of (FAS), Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Islamic Studies, Diaspora/Transnational, Anthropology (UTSC), Anthropology (UTM), Anthropology (FAS), 2000-
Lecture by Zareena Grewal, Yale

The Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies and the Institute for Islamic Studies are pleased to present:

Zareena Grewal, American Studies and Religious Studies, Yale University

Islam is a Foreign Country: Global Muslim Pedagogical Networks and the Crisis of Authority

In her new book, Islam is a Foreign Country, anthropologist Zareena Grewal explores some of the most pressing debates about and among Muslims in the U.S.: What does it mean to be Muslim and American? Who has the authority to speak for Islam and to lead the stunningly diverse population of American Muslims? Do their ties to the larger Muslim world undermine their efforts to make Islam an American religion? Offering rich insights into these questions and more, Grewal follows the journeys of Muslim youth from the U.S. who travel in global, underground Islamic networks. Devoutly religious and often politically disaffected, these young men and women are in search of a home for themselves and their tradition. Through their stories, Grewal captures the multiple directions of the global flows of people, practices, and ideas that connect U.S. mosques to the Muslim world. By examining the tension between American Muslims' ambivalence toward the American mainstream and their desire to enter it, Grewal puts contemporary debates about Islam in the context of a long history of American racial and religious exclusions. Probing the competing obligations of American Muslims to the nation and to the umma (the global community of Muslim believers), she investigates the meaning of national citizenship and the place of Islam in a global age.

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is not required. For further information, please contact the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies at (416) 946-8464.

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