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Neo-Fascist or Revolutionary Leftist: Intergenerational Transmission and Political Choice of Activists in the Anni di Piombo

Neo-Fascist or Revolutionary Leftist: Intergenerational Transmission and Political Choice of Activists in the Anni di Piombo
121 St. Jospeh St., Room 400
Time: Mar 27th, 4:00 pm End: Mar 27th, 6:00 pm
Interest Categories: Political Science, Marxist, Italian Studies (FAS), History (FAS), Historical Studies (UTM), Historical and Cultural Studies (UTSC), 1950-2000, 1900-1950
Lecture by Jack Veugelers, Sociology, University of Toronto

Prof. Salvatore Bancheri
Emilio Goggio Chair in Italian Studies
University of Toronto
 
cordially invites you to a public lecture by

Jack Veugelers, Sociology, University of Toronto

Neo-fascist or Revolutionary Leftist: Inter-generational Transmission and Political Choice of Activists in the Anni di Piombo

 
Thursday, March 27, 2014
4:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Alumni Hall 400
121 St. Joseph Street, St. Michael’s College
University of Toronto
 
A reception will follow.
Everyone is welcome and admission is free, but registration is required. To register, please click HERE.
 
Should the youth activism of the 1960s and 70s be seen as a rebellion against older generations? This lecture will discuss how the thesis of generational rebellion can distort our understanding of the choices made by activists. Specifically, significant elements of continuity joined family politics to the kind of movement entered
by Italians. My presentation will draw extensively on interviews with activists who belonged to either the revolutionary left or the neo-fascist right during the Anni di Piombo.
 
Jack Veugelers is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto, St. George. He received his B.A. (in Sociology and Anthropology) from the University of Toronto and his M.A. and Ph.D. (in Sociology) from Princeton University. He joined the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto in 1996, and in 2001 he received the Outstanding Teaching Award from the Faculty of Arts and Science. His research has focused primarily on right-wing extremism and the politics of immigration in Canada and Europe (especially France and Italy). He is currently engaged in three research projects: (1) Under what conditions do parties survive or fail? A study of party organizational persistence in Italy since the early 1990s; (2) Under what conditions does participation in voluntary associations enhance or undermine democratic politics? A study of the politics of European ex-colonials from Algeria who now reside in France that traces the connections between colonialism, voluntary association, and right-wing extremism in France today; (3) Abeyance structures and social movements – a study of the historical transmission of neo-fascist activism in post-war Italy.

For further information, please contact the Department of Italian Studies at (416) 926-2345.

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