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Ashur, Assyria's Capital City: A Century's Worth of Excavation, Research, and Publications

Ashur, Assyria's Capital City: A Century's Worth of Excavation, Research, and Publications
5 Bancroft Avenue, Earth Sciences Auditorium B149
Time: Nov 5th, 8:00 pm End: Nov 5th, 9:45 pm
Interest Categories: Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), History (FAS), Historical Studies (UTM), Historical and Cultural Studies (UTSC), German (FAS), before 400 BCE, Architecture, Landscape, Design, Archaeology, 400-1 BCE, 2000-, 1950-2000, 1900-1950
Lecture by Dr. Friedhelm Pedde, Project Manager, Ashur Project, Berlin

The Canadian Society for Mesopotamian Studies is pleased to present the Ronald Morton Smith Memorial Lecture:

Dr. Friedhelm Pedde, Project Manager, Ashur Project, Berlin

Ashur, Assyria's Capital City: A Century's Worth of Excavation, Research and Publications

Undertaken between 1903 and 1914, the German Oriental Society's work at Assyria's ancient capital continues to be of fundamental importance for Mesopotamia's archeological history. Under the visionary leadership of Walter Andrae, new excavation techniques were developed that for the first time allowed the systematic and stratigraphic exposure and documentation of mudbrick buildings. Unlike the larger and more famous royal cities of Nimrud and Nineveh, excavations at Ashur penetrating deep into layers from the third and second millenium BC offer unparalleled insights into the origins of the Assyrian state. The outcome of two world wars, at times tragically separating archaeological materials from researchers in a divided Berlin, long impeded a full study and publication of the excavated materials. Launched in 1997 and supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG), the Ashur Project allowed for a comprehensive reanalysis of all archaeological materials and documents, which resulted in a comprehensive series of publications. This lecture will summarize the history of the excavations and highlight some of the new discoveries made by the Ashur Project.

This lecture is free and open to all.  For further information, please contact the Canadian Society for Mesopotamian Studies (CSMS) at (416) 978-4531 or visit the website at www.chass.utoronto/csms.

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