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The Politics of Printed Books: Religious Texts, Catholics, and Post-Reformation England

The Politics of Printed Books: Religious Texts, Catholics, and Post-Reformation England
89 Charles Street, Burwash Hall Senior Common Room
Time: Feb 4th, 5:00 pm End: Feb 4th, 6:30 pm
Interest Categories: Religion, Study of (FAS), History (FAS), Historical Studies (UTM), Historical and Cultural Studies (UTSC), English and Drama (UTM), English (UTSC), English (FAS), Book History/Print Culture, 1500-1800
Lecture by Elizabeth Ferguson, University of Toronto

The Association of Renaissance Students is pleased to present

Elizabeth Ferguson, University of Toronto

The Politics of Printed Books: Religious Texts, Catholics, and Post-Reformation England

More than sixteen hundred English Catholic books were published between 1558 and 1640 and disseminated among the minority English Catholic population, both in England and abroad. This literature, while largely devotional in content, also served broader objectives. Using a few case studies, this talk will look beyond the devotional purposes of these books by exploring the wider political implications of their publication and dissemination. In particular, this paper will examine the relationship between text and dedication, and will seek to place this seemingly devotional literature in the context of religion, politics and loyalty to the crown in sixteenth and early seventeenth century England.

Elizabeth Ferguson is an Assistant Professor in the History Department at the University of Toronto. She is currently preparing book on devotional literature and English Catholic practice c. 1570-1640, and most recently published an article on hagiographies and the cult of saints in seventeenth-century England. Her next major research project will explore the wider religio-political implications of English Catholic literature printed in the early modern period by looking at the relationship between the writer/translator, religious and polemical texts, and the system of patronage.

This event is free and open to all. For further information, please contact the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at (416) 585-4468.


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