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The Cyborg in Globalizing India: Technology, Community, and Revolution in Indra Sinha's Animal's People and Altaf Tyrewala's Engglishhh(C)

The Cyborg in Globalizing India: Technology, Community, and Revolution in Indra Sinha's Animal's People and Altaf Tyrewala's Engglishhh(C)
1 Devonshire Place, Munk School of Global Affairs, Room 208N
Time: Mar 8th, 2:00 pm End: Mar 8th, 4:00 pm
Interest Categories: South Asian, English and Drama (UTM), English (UTSC), English (FAS), 2000-
Talk by Stephanie Southmayd, Doctoral Student, Department of English and Collaborative Program in South Asian Studies, University of Toronto

The Centre for South Asian Studies and the Asian Institute present

The Cyborg in Globalizing India: Technology, Community, and Revolution in Indra Sinha's Animal's People and Altaf Tyrewala's Engglishhh©

In this presentation I look at technology, particularly in the form of machines like the telephone and tape recorder, as well as more abstract and nebulous technologies like the Internet, to map the formation of cyborg and what I call "sahiborg" subjectivities in an era of rapidly changing and ever-improving modes of communication. These technologies seem at once to bring us closer together and further apart, fostering a greater sense of global solidarity and "connectivity," in John Tomlinson's terms, but also setting out battle lines for revolutionary new Indian movements: between the international rich and poor, in Sinha's work, and Global North and South, in Tyrewala's.

Stephanie Southmayd is a fifth-year doctoral student in the English programme at the University of Toronto. Her interest in the issues of globalized middle-class labour, business, and technology in South Asian literature stems from the time she spent in Gurgaon, India, where she worked as an editor for an outsourcing firm before returning to graduate school. She hopes to finish her dissertation on postmillennial Indian fiction in English and its narrative strategies with regards to globalization and nationalism by late spring 2016.

This event is free and open to all. Register online. For further information, please contact Katherine MacIvor at 416-946-8832

 

 

 


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