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Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea

Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea
1 Devonshire Place, Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs
Time: Sep 15th, 2:00 pm End: Sep 15th, 4:00 pm
Interest Categories: Sociology (FAS), Slavic Studies (FAS), Humanities, Geography & Planning (FAS), East Asian Studies (FAS), Anthropology (UTSC), Anthropology (UTM), Anthropology (FAS), 2000-
Book Launch

The Centre for the Study of Korea and the Asian Institute present

Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea

Decentering Citizenship follows three groups of Filipina migrants' struggles to belong in South Korea: factory workers claiming rights as workers, wives of South Korean men claiming rights as mothers, and hostesses at American military clubs who are excluded from claims-unless they claim to be victims of trafficking. Moving beyond laws and policies, Hae Yeon Choo examines how rights are enacted, translated, and challenged in daily life and ultimately interrogates the concept of citizenship.

Choo reveals citizenship as a language of social and personal transformation within the pursuit of dignity, security, and mobility. Her vivid ethnography of both migrants and their South Korean advocates illuminates how social inequalities of gender, race, class, and nation operate in defining citizenship. Decentering Citizenship argues that citizenship emerges from negotiations about rights and belonging between South Koreans and migrants. As the promise of equal rights and full membership in a polity erodes in the face of global inequalities, this decentering illuminates important contestation at the margins of citizenship.

Hae Yeon Choo is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto, Mississauga. Her book Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016) examines how inequalities of gender, race, and class affect migrant rights through a comparative study of three groups of Filipina women in South Korea-factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and club hostesses.

Speakers

Hae Yeon Choo, Speaker
Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto, Mississauga

Rachel Silvey, Chair
Acting Director, Collaborative Master's Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Associate Professor, Department Of Geography

Jesook Song, Discussant
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology; Collaborative Master's Program In Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute

Anna Koreteweg, Discussant
Professor, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

 

This event is free and open to all. Registration is required. For further information, please contact the Asian Institute, Rachel Ostep at
416-946-8996.

 


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