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Playing with Nature: Exploring the History of Golf Course Construction in North America, 1873-1945

Playing with Nature: Exploring the History of Golf Course Construction in North America, 1873-1945
Munk School of Global Affairs, Room 208N
Time: Nov 30th, 4:00 pm End: Nov 30th, 6:00 pm
Interest Categories: United States Studies, Sociology (FAS), Political Science, Information, Faculty of, History (FAS), History & Philosophy of Science & Technology (FAS), Historical Studies (UTM), Geography & Planning (FAS), Environment, Architecture, Landscape, Design, Anthropology (UTM), Anthropology (FAS), 1900-1950, 1800-1900
Lecture by Elizabeth Jewett, doctoral candidate in History, University of Toronto

The Centre for the Study of the United States is pleased to present

Elizabeth Jewett
Playing with Nature: Exploring the History of Golf Course Construction in North America, 1873-1945

Organized by the Centre for the Study of the United States Graduate Student Workshop

Abstract
Between 1873 and 1945, golf grew from a recreational activity for the wealthy to a popular sporting interest amongst the upper-middle and some members of the working class in North America. As the sport spread across the continent, class, culture, and the physical environment interacted when it came to imagining and building new “golfscapes.” Jewett’s paper explores how these new golfing landscapes were a product of the architects, greens keepers, and golfers’ shifting notions of what made a first-class golf course, as transnational design ideals and technological innovations intersected with the local, social, and environmental realities. Through the examples of the transatlantic circulation of golf architecture principles, and the establishment of the Green Section of the United States Golf Association, she illustrates how designing and building “golfscapes” in North America helped to create a new type of human/nature interaction, which blended together pre-existing ways to conceptualize, shape, and experience the natural world.

Elizabeth Jewett is finishing the fourth year of her PhD program in the History Department at the University of Toronto. Jewett is an administrator and participant in several academic environmental history organizations including: Quelques Arpents de Neiges, and the Network in Canadian History and the Environment (NiCHE).

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required. To register for this event, click HERE.

For further information, please contact the Centre for Study of the United States at (416) 946-8972


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