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Crafting Theatrical (and Editorial) Effect in Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness

Crafting Theatrical (and Editorial) Effect in Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness
170 St. George St. rm 100a
Time: Mar 22nd, 4:00 pm End: Mar 22nd, 6:00 pm
Interest Categories: Women/Gender, Medieval Studies (FAS), History (FAS), Historical Studies (UTM), English and Drama (UTM), English (UTSC), English (FAS), Drama, Theatre, Performance Studies (FAS), Critical Theory, Communications, Book History/Print Culture, 1500-1800
CANCELLED due to illness. Lecture by Margaret Jane Kidnie, English, University of Western Ontario

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO ILLNESS.

 

The Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium and the Department of English are pleased to present:

Margaret Jane Kidnie, English, University of Western Ontario

Crafting Theatrical (and Editorial) Effect in Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness

Margaret Jane Kidnie is interested in early modern drama as it bridges the fields of performance and textual studies. Her most recent book, Shakespeare and the Problem of Adaptation (2009) is an attempt to bring these two fields together to understand better fundamental questions about the identity of Shakespeare’s drama. She is currently writing an article provisionally called “Staging Audience Pleasure in Stage Beauty and The Eyre Affair” , and completing two editions of early modern drama. The first is of an anonymous manuscript play discovered at Arbury Hall, Warwickshire which has been assigned the title of The Humorous Magistrate, which is forthcoming with The Malone Society. The second is Thomas Heywood’s A Woman Killed with Kindness for the Arden Early Modern Drama series.

Abstract:  Was Thomas Heywood a hack writer for the Red Bull Theatre? That criticism has discouraged editors from explaining the staging peculiarities of crucial passages of A Woman Killed with Kindness: the “card game” in Scene 8 and Frankford’s passage through his house when Scene 13 opens. Margaret Jane Kidnie brings a fresh perspective to the play by looking both at Heywood’s stagecraft in other scenes, and at the solutions of professional productions since 1971. By reconstructing the earliest staging it’s possible to suggest a solution to at least one editorial problem.

THIS TALK HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED FROM 8 FEBRUARY 2013 TO 22 MARCH 2013 DUE TO WEATHER CONDITIONS.

The Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium (TRRC) offers a yearly programme of lectures on topics in the period 1350-1700, presented by scholars from Toronto, southern Ontario, and the north-eastern USA, in partnership with the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, and this year with a special lecture co-presented with the University of Toronto Department of English.

The lectures are free and open to the public, but the TRRC requests that regular attenders puchase an inexpensive membership to help with the costs of production.  For further information about this event and the TRRC, please contact Konrad Eisenbichler or call the CRRS at (416) 585-4484.

Download talk flyer [pdf]

Download membership form [pdf]

Download this season's lecture schedule [pdf]

 

 


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