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Thinking About Dinner

Thinking About Dinner
170 St. George Street, room 100
Time: Mar 1st, 3:30 pm End: Mar 2nd, 4:00 pm
Interest Categories: Science/Technology, Humanities, History (FAS), History & Philosophy of Science & Technology (FAS), Historical Studies (UTM), Historical and Cultural Studies (UTSC), East Asian Studies (FAS), Drama, Theatre, Performance Studies (FAS), Digital Art/Humanities, Communication, Culture, Information and Technology (UTM), Arts, Culture and Media (UTSC), Art (FAS), Anthropology (UTSC), Anthropology (UTM), Anthropology (FAS), 2000-, 1950-2000
Workshop on sensory appreciation of taste and new techniques in cuisine.

The Jackman Humanities Institute and the Network for Sensory Research are pleased to present a workshop on cuisine

Thinking About Dinner

Featuring:

Friday March 1

3:30-4:45 Charles Spence (Oxford) "Visual Display of Food: Historical Reflections"
5:00-6:15 Ophelia Deroy (London) "Food as Art"
6:30-7:30 Chef Charles Michel (Bogotá)

Saturday March 2

10:30-11:45 Katarzyna Cwiertka (Leiden) "Kaiseki and Japanese Cuisine"
12:30-1:15 Dan Felder, Head of R&D, Momofuku Culinary Lab
2:30-3:45 Peter Ludlow (Northwestern) "Molecular Gastronomy as Hacktivism"
4:00-5:30 Round Table Discussion: Steven Shapin (Harvard), Barry Smith (London), Mohan Matthen (Toronto), Ryan Miller (Momofuku Culinary Lab)

Traditionally, food choices were seen simply as a matter of sensory pleasure. Consequently, the focus for consumers and producers was exclusively on the quality of the food and wine consumed. However, there is increasing awareness of the importance, first, of the overall experience in which a meal is consumed, and, second, of culinary culture

Recent research in the sensory and food sciences has shown just how multi- sensory the experience of  eating and drinking are, and how extrinsic circumstances not only contribute to overall enjoyment, but even influence the perception of flavour. In an important development, chefs now work with scientists (including cognitive and behavioural scientists) in a quest to discover what makes for the perfect meal. They have also begun to experiment with new configurations of the ancient components of appreciating meals. They are deconstructing and reconstructing traditional cooking.

Until about 1965, restaurants shared the same aesthetic goals as home cooks, though of course with professional levels of execution. Culinary technique was perfected in restaurants, but culinary aesthetics emerged from homes. In the last fifty years, however, a new culinary aesthetic has developed, an aesthetic that originates in restaurants, not homes. The apex of the new aesthetic is to be found in such restaurants as El Bulli, Fat Duck, and Noma. Importantly, each of these restaurants has research and technical  development projects of their own.

Some results: the use of vacuum and low cooking temperatures, flash freezing with liquid nitrogen,  ultra-high temperature searing, and other such “molecular” techniques; the development of new food sources and new ways of using foods, including notably moss, fungus, seaweed and kelp.

These R&D projects are housed in dedicated research facilities. While some of these resultant techniques will undoubtedly enter home cuisine (and already have), and be adapted to the social aesthetic of eating at home, it is important to recognize that they represent a new way of appreciating food. They are arguably the basis of a new cuisine, perhaps even more distinct than classical French cuisine and Japanese kaiseki are from the corresponding home cuisines.

This event is free and open to the pubic. Due to space limitations, we request that you register if you plan to come.  To register, click HERE.

PLEASE NOTE: LOCATION HAS BEEN CHANGED FROM JHB1040 T0 JHB100 DUE TO DEMAND

PLEASE ACCEPT OUR APOLOGIES.  THIS EVENT IS NOW SOLD OUT. 

IF YOU HAVE REGISTERED, BUT WILL NOT BE ABLE TO ATTEND, PLEASE CONTACT KIM YATES AT JHI.ASSOCIATE@UTORONTO.CA OR (416) 946-0313 TO RELEASE YOUR SEAT.

For further information, please contact Kim Yates at (416) 946-0313 or jhi.associate@utoronto.ca

Download flyer [pdf]

Note:  Katarzyna Cwiertka will also be giving a second lecture on campus for the Asian Institute on Thursday 28 February, 2-4 pm at 1 Devonshire Place room 108N (north house).  The title is

Cuisine, Colonialism and the (Cold) War: A Fresh Perspective on the Modern History of East Asia

Registration is requested:  http://www.munk.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?EventId=13276

 


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