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The Case of the Disappearing Latinos: the Consequences of (Non) Ethnic Identification for Understanding Latino Political Participation in the United States

The Case of the Disappearing Latinos: the Consequences of (Non) Ethnic Identification for Understanding Latino Political Participation in the United States
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place
Time: Feb 27th, 2:00 pm End: Feb 27th, 4:00 pm
Interest Categories: United States Studies, Sociology (FAS), Political Science, Latin American, Humanities, Human Geography (UTSC), Historical Studies (UTM), Historical and Cultural Studies (UTSC), Diaspora/Transnational, Communication, Culture, Information and Technology (UTM), Cities and Humanities, Anthropology (UTSC), Anthropology (UTM), Anthropology (FAS), 2000-, 1950-2000
Lecture by Professor David Leal

The Centre for the Study of the United States, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto proudly present:

Professor David Leal,  Department of Government, University of Texas at Austin.

The Case of the Disappearing Latinos: the Consequences of (Non) Ethnic Identification for Understanding Latino Political Participation in the United States

David Leal is Associate Professor in the Department of Government, and Director of the Irma Rangel Public Policy Institute, at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. Dr. Leal’s primary academic interest is Latino politics. His goal is to understand how Latino individuals and communities shape, and are shaped by, politics in the United States. Because these are complex and multifaceted dynamics, his research spans the fields of public policy, political behaviour, and public opinion. His recent publications include: The Politics of Latino Education (with Kenneth J. Meier), Eds. (2011); and “Religion in Latino Political and Civic Lives,” in Alan Wolfe and Ira Katznelson (Eds.), Religion and Democracy in the United States: Danger or Opportunity? (2010).


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